VIOLENT FOOLISHNESS AND VIOLENT PEACE by Gabriel Alejandro

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 22 Second

In
a global context convulsed by strong economic, political and social crises,
Latin America is no exception to the rule. Gone is the stage where the
presidents of the Latin American neighboring countries were traveling in
defense of democracy, those times where Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, along
with other presidents, tried to stop a coup in Honduras or Peru.
Nowadays,
Latin American countries have been facing what some political analysts have
called a “right turn” for more than four years, where figures, which in some
cases are not from the world of politics, are inserted in electoral races To
win the presidency.
This
was the case of Jair Bolsonaro and Mauricio Macri, who for years have disputed,
in one way or another, political power, coming from the Brazilian Army and
another from the Argentine business. These characters are responsible, from
their triumph in the elections, of making violent adjustments in the States and
implementing repression as a common use of violence by the State towards
society.
Just
to mention the famous title of Pierre Clastres, “The Society against the
State”, we will say that in the particular case of Latin American
countries, the State stood against society and dynamited certain structures
that benefited the popular sectors and communities less favored, as is the case
of the Brazilian indigenous community or the crime of Rafael Nahuel in
Argentina.
As
if it were a portrait of what happened in Argentina in 2013, the Bolivian police
opted to quartered, leaving one of the powers of the aforementioned
plurinational State acéfalo. Given this unforeseen (planned by Bolivian
right-wing sectors) a series of social conflicts broke out that ended with the
“suggestion” of the Bolivian military that Evo Morales leave the
power he held for 14 uninterrupted years.
In
the face of street violence and the coup d’état of the armed forces, the then
president decided to step aside in order to recover the peace his country so
much needed. The response to this measure was even more violence, repression
and kidnappings that have stained those who proclaimed themselves as the
president of the State, Jeanine Áñez, a senator who opposes Morales, who
without quorum or respect for the National Constitution irregularly occupies
power.
The
Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is very concerned about this
situation, since the repression is framed within a wave of racism and hatred
linked to the ethnicity of Bolivian native peoples.
Income
to homes in a violent way, kidnapping of children, killed by tens and injured
is the result of the repressive policies of Áñez, the alleged “pacifying”
interim that did nothing but generate worse chaos. That is why we reflect on
“Violent Peace” on purpose and without measuring consequences.
The
Chilean context, in institutional violence, does not depart from the Bolivian
one, although there is a difference: Piñera, current president of Chile, was
democratically elected and Bachelet’s transition to Piñera was allegedly
“normal.” Today you can see how many of the problems suffered by the
Chilean people were silenced by mass media that, nowadays, defend the Piñera
regime and hide the atrocious violence with which the State represses
protesters.
The
foolishness of a Chilean president of not wanting to resign, even with protests
that lead to the greatest destruction and signs of excessive violence that left
hundreds of Chileans blind, made the violence increase and the levels of
participation of the people in the protests I was older.
With
different contexts but similar realities regarding violence, neither Evo
Morales renouncing, nor Piñera deaf to the people could curb the sustained
conflict between protesters and police. In other words, a question remains in
the inkwell: are we facing a State against the State?
Below is a brief profile of Gabriel Alejandro

Gabriel
Alejandro López Pepa, Argentino,
Former Chief Editor of La Columna Magazine
and current Editorial Coordinator of the State and Society Magazine
(CEDEP-UNSE
). Technician in Economic and Social Information. Researcher
(UNSE-FHCSyS) PhD in Sociology. (FHCSyS-UNSE). It also has a Postgraduate in
Descriptive Statistics Applied to Education.


About Post Author

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.